Publications / 1987 Proceedings of the 4th ISARC, Haifa, Israel

Using Artificial Intelligence Techniques for Automated Planning and Scheduling

Raymond E. Levitt, John C. Kunz, Nabil A. Kartam
Pages 27-52 (1987 Proceedings of the 4th ISARC, Haifa, Israel)
Abstract:

"This paper develops a philosophy for the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques as aids in engineering project management. We start by classifying the subtasks associated with project management as taxonomy of separate functions and levels. We then assess the cognitive requirements for each project management subtask. Recognizing the cognitive requirements of each subtask and the limitations of existing computer tools for project management decision support, we propose guidelines for using AI and procedural programming techniques to support decision making in each phase and at each level of project management. First, we propose that traditional domain-independent. “means-end” planners may be valuable aids for planning detailed subtasks on projects, but that domain-specific planning tools are needed for work package or executive level project planning. Next, we propose that hybrid computer systems, using knowledge processing techniques in conjunction with procedural techniques such as decision analysis and network-based scheduling, can provide valuable new kinds of decisions support for project objective-setting and project control, respectively. Finally we suggest that knowledge-based interactive graphics, developed for providing graphical explanations and user control in advanced knowledge processing environments, can provide powerful new kinds of decision support for project management. The first claim is supported by a review and analysis of previous work in the area of automates AI planning techniques. Our experience with PLATFORM I, II and III, a series of prototype AI-leveraged project management systems built using the Intelli Corp Knowledge Engineering Environment (KEETM), provides the justification for the latter two claims. "

Keywords: No keywords